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Performance tools for Eclipse RCP Applications

Posted by sureshkrishna on August 4, 2007

Recently i have been looking for the Testing, Performance and Runtime Visualization tools for Eclipse RCP Platform. The real challenge is to choose the variety of the tools that we have today in the market and which one suits us.
I have done almost few weeks of research and foudn some good tools for desktop applications. I am mainly concerned with the analysis of the runtime performance of custom developed plugins. I have a great things to deal on the SWT and JFace UI.
Anyway i want to give few resources for all of you who are interested in these tools.

http://jakarta.apache.org/jmeter  I ma sure everyone knows about it. Its the Apache kid and adopted by many enterprises for the J2EE performance tracking on the servers. In anycase as i am more interested in the desktop applications i had to lookinto others.
http://sourceforge.net/projects/jmechanic  I have heard a lot about this in the initial 2003 and 2004 but as i also see from the website, there are no prominent releases recently.
http://www.quest.com/jprobe  This is a real cool tool available today. I have checked it couple of times and i am impressed. It gives a very clear stats of the stack trace and call hierarchy. It can debug even the remote applications and its nice. I would definately recommend JProbe if you like it.
http://www.eclipse.org/tptp  As everyone knows its a subproject from eclipse and its a great platform to work on. As with my experience, its a little bit of effort to install, configure and run the plugin. Once you are used to it, its a GREAT thing on eclipse platform. You get all sorts of the stats that you want. How many Objects are alive, whats the sequance of the Object invocation, how many threads are alive, memory footprint, etc…
http://java.sun.com/performance/jvmstat  The jvmstat technology adds light weight performance and configuration instrumentation to the HotSpot JVM and provides a set of monitoring APIs and tools for monitoring the performance of the HotSpot JVM in production environments. The instrumentation is designed such that it is ‘always on’, yet has negligible performance impact. The monitoring interfaces added to the HotSpot JVM are proprietary and may or may not be supported in future versions of the HotSpot JVM.

Hope this helps for you some how.

Posted in Eclipse Performance, JMechanic, JMeter, JProbe, TPTP | 1 Comment »

 
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